Cadmium intake via oysters and health effects in New Zealand cadmium intake, metabolism, and effects in people with a high intake of oysters in New Zealand by Joan McKenzie

Cover of: Cadmium intake via oysters and health effects in New Zealand | Joan McKenzie

Published by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Health Effects Research Laboratory in Research Triangle Park, NC .

Written in English

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Subjects:

  • Oysters,
  • Food consumption -- New Zealand,
  • Cadmium -- Analysis

Edition Notes

Book details

StatementJoan McKenzie, Tord Kjellstrom, and Ram Sharma
ContributionsKjellström, Tord, 1943-, Sharma, Ram, Health Effects Research Laboratory (Research Triangle Park, N.C.)
The Physical Object
Pagination3 p. ;
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14890508M

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McKenzie, J., Kjellstrom, T., Sharma, P., Cadmium intake via oysters and health effects in New Zealand: cadmium intake, metabolism and effects in people with a high intake of oysters in New Zealand. Project Summary.

US Environmental Protection Agency EPA Report, EPA///, by: The complete report, entitled "Cadmium Intake Via Oysters and Health Effects in New Zealand: Cadmium Intake, Metabolism and Effects in People with a High Intake of Oysters in New Zealand," (Order No.

PB /AS; Cost: $, subject to change) will be available only from: National Technical Information Service Port Royal Road. Get this from a library. Cadmium intake via oysters and health effects in New Zealand: cadmium intake, metabolism, and effects in people with a high intake of oysters in New Zealand.

[Joan McKenzie; Tord Kjellström; Ram Sharma; Health Effects. via oysters and health effects in New Zealand: cadmium. intake, metabolism and effects in people with a high intake of. of cadmium intake to prevent renal toxicity in human : George Kruzynski.

Cadmium intake via oysters and health effects in New Zealand [microform]: Cadmium intake, metabolism, and effects in people with a high intake of oysters in New Zealand.

US: Environmental Protection Agency; Research Triangle Park, NC: EPA//S/Cited by: intake via oysters and health effects in New Zealand: a high intake of oysters in New Zealand. region is important for monitoring environmental cadmium pollution and health effects.

In the. Cadmium levels were higher in oysters than in mussels, with New Zealand oysters containing the highest concentration of cadmium presented.

New Zealanders also had the highest cadmium burdens in the kidneys and the highest daily intakes. A No Observable Effect Level (NOEL) was calculated from mice data and compared to the daily intakes of the. McKENZIE, J.M., T. KJELLSTROM AND R.P. SHARMA: Cadmium Intake Metabolism and Effects in Cadmium intake via oysters and health effects in New Zealand book with a High Intake of Oysters in New Zealand.

EPA Report, Washington. Coordination meeting for reviewing cadmium issues in potatoes & vegetables / L. Sparrow, M. Mclaughlin; Managing cadmium in summer grain legumes for premium quality produce / compiled by Agency for Food and F Cadmium intake via oysters and health effects in New Zealand [microform]: cadmium intake, metabolism, a.

Humans are exposed to cadmium (Cd) via food, water, air and dust. Outside of the industrial environment, the main source of environmental Cd exposure for the general population is intake from food. This is illus- trated in Table I: 70% of total Cd intake comes from foodL In contrast.

Status of cadmium in New Zealand soils: ; How MPI monitors cadmium in food. Cadmium levels in food are monitored as part of the New Zealand Total Diet Study run by MPI every 5 years.

Results from the latest Total Diet Study continue to confirm that the amount of cadmium in the diet of the average New Zealander is within World Health. Adverse effects of cadmium on kidney and be attained at the cadmium intake of 1 µg/kg body weight/day over 50 years The renal cortical cad- mium content was reported for some New Zealand bluff oysters A bioavailability study was conducted on 57 men and 19 women years.

Cadmium Intake, Metabolism and Effects in People with a High Intake of Oysters in New Zealand. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Report No. R Google Scholar.

of metals (Whyte et al. Cadmium con-tent of some Pacific oysters was found to be mg/kg dry weight, whereas 2-fold higher cadmium content was reported for some New Zealand bluff oysters (Copes et al. A bioavailability study was conducted on 57. Some communities in New Zealand eat high cadmium shellfish with no apparent effect.

Diets adequate in iron, calcium and zinc appear to lower cadmium absorption. (Oysters are also extremely high in those elements.) Women seem more vulnerable than men, perhaps because of low iron levels. Older people are less vulnerable. Cadmium Intake via Oysters and Health Effects in New Zealand [microform]: Cadmium Intake, Metabolism, and Effects in People with a High Intake of Ooysters in New Zealand.

EPA//S/ McLaughlin MJ, Whatmuff M, Warne M, Heemsbergen D, Barry G, Bell M, et al. A field investigation of solubility and food chain accumulation of biosolid.

detrimental health effects, in particular this study investigates cadmiums immunosuppressive properties. Concentrations in New Zealand were compared with Canada, Italy and the UK to determine if New Zealand has a relatively high cadmium intake.

Interestingly environmental levels (soil and oceanic) in New Zealand were low. mammals fed with cadmium-rich diets and in certain species of oysters, scallops, mussels and crustaceans. Lower cadmium concentrations are found in vegetables, cereals and starchy roots. Owing to the larger consumption of such food items, they represent the greater part of daily cadmium intake in most populations.

2,5. System, and levels of cadmium reported in typical diet of New Zealanders. Introduction Cadmium is a heavy metal, naturally present at low levels in air, water and soil.

Cadmium is accepted as a carcinogen by the inhalation pathway1. Safe levels for dietary exposure to cadmium over a lifetimes intake, are provided by the World Health Organizations. Human dietary exposure to heavy metals via the consumption of greenshell mussels (Perna canaliculus Gmelin ) from the Bay of Islands, northern New Zealand.

Science of the Total Environment. (), doi: /j_scitotenv   Cadmium is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant of increasing worldwide concern. Food crops grown on Cd-containing soils or on soils naturally rich in this metal constitute a major source of nonworkplace exposure to Cd other than exposure from cigarette smoking [International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS) ; Jarup et al.

; Satarug et al. a, ; World Health. The effects of exposure to any hazardous substance depend on the dose, the duration, how you are exposed, personal traits and habits, and whether other chemicals are present. For more information, call the ATSDR Information Center at This public health statement tells you about cadmium and the effects of exposure to it.

McKenzie J, Kjellstrom T, Sharma R. Project Summary. Cadmium Intake via Oysters and Health Effects in New Zealand [microform]: Cadmium Intake, Metabolism, and Effects in People with a High Intake of Ooysters in New Zealand.

EPA//S/ Research Triangle Park, NC:US Environmental Protection Agency. New Zealanders also inhale cadmium – in a form which is thought to be carcinogenic – in tobacco smoke, and eat it in fish such as Bluff oysters. New Zealand farmers are pouring an average of.

Cd & Shellfish Human Health Studies • (SharmaMcKenzie et al. ) – Cd in oyster fishermen after consuming New Zealand dredge oysters – Cd in participant’s blood and urine not elevated in proportion to amount ingested – Little Cd appeared to be absorbed and was instead excreted in feces – Smoking found to have more pronounced.

Self-protection by avoiding cadmium intake would be the most effective measure. The Thai maximum limit for Cd in shellfish still has not been established. Average consumption of blood cockle contaminated with Cd in level close to the maximum limit set by Australia New Zealand Food Standards lead to the exposure exceeded PTMI.

Cadmium in Oysters. Recently, a local newspaper reported that certain dried oyster samples purchased in Shenzhen and Hong Kong were found to contain cadmium ranged from to parts per million (ppm).

Cadmium is a metal that exists naturally in the earth's crust. cadmium intake is below the PTWI. The Canadian Guidelines for dietary intake of cadmium through oyster con-sumptions advise a limit of oyster consumption of 12 oysters a month for adults (i.e.,3person−1 week−1).

Ignoring cadmium intake from other dietary sources, in-take of three BC farmed oysters (average weight ranges from 40 to 50 g) high in. Effects of elevated temperature and cadmium exposure on stress protein response in eastern oysters Crassostrea virginica (Gmelin).

Aquatic toxicol – (). CAS. Review article Safe levels of cadmium intake to prevent renal toxicity in human subjects Soisungwan Satarug1*, Melissa R.

Haswell-Elkins2 and Michael R. Moore1 1National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology and 2Indigenous Primary Health Program, The University of Queensland, 39 Kessels Road, Coopers Plains, BrisbaneQueensland, Australia.

A new study has found that even relatively low levels of heavy metal pollution can interfere with the metabolic processes of oysters, and that the effects of the pollution become particularly.

Nordberg M, Nuottaniemi I, Cherian M, Nordberg G, Kjellström T and Garvey J () Characterization studies on the cadmium-binding proteins from two species of New Zealand oysters., Environmental Health Perspectives, 65, (), Online publication date: 1-Mar Announcement for Publication Material Project Summaries Environmental Health Effects Research Final Report on the Evaluation of Four Toxic Chemicals in an In Vitro Toxicological Screen: Acrylamide, Chlordecone, Cyclophosphamide, and Diethylstibestrol (EPA//S/) Carcinogenic Potential of Arsenic Compounds in Drinking Water (EPA//S/) Cadmium.

The New Zealand Total Diet Study found that cadmium intake by different age and gender groups of New Zealanders was 50% or less of the Provisional Monthly Tolerable Intake recommended by the World Health Organisation.

Introduction Cadmium (Cd) is a heavy-metal contaminant of phosphate (P) fertiliser. Where there is. Effects of natural factors (salinity and body weight) on cadmium, copper, zinc and metallothionein-like protein levels in resident populations of oysters Crassostrea gigas from a polluted estuary.

Mar. Ecol. Prog. Ser. Nielson, S. Cadmium in New Zealand dredge oysters: geographic distribution. Int. Environ. Anal. Chem. Gastrointestinal Effects: Cadmium ingested in high doses irritates the gastric epithelium.

The most common way that acute poisoning via cadmium ingestion occurs is consumption of acidic food or beverages improperly stored in containers with a cadmium glaze (Lewis ).

The symptoms of severe cadmium ingestion are. nausea, vomiting. Considering present levels of occupational exposure cadmium intake, general dietary intake, and cigarette smoking intake, it still would appear, however, that the average daily cadmium intake is well below the values recommended by the World Health Organisation.

Human Health Effects of Cadmium. 10 New Zealand of 1 mg/kg fresh weight (Anon. Solly et a1. () conducted a survey of cattle, sheep, and pigs in New Zealand and concluded that mean Cd concentrations in the kidneys, liver, and muscle of New Zealand farm stock were either lower or no greater than values reported by other workers in animals from overseas.

To avoid the risk of cadmium entering the food chain, the sale of offal from ruminant animals older than 30 months is prohibited in New Zealand. Naturally high levels of cadmium are also found in some shellfish and crustaceans. Smoking cigarettes is a major route for exposure to cadmium.

Effects of cadmium. Levels of Cadmium in the Sample. The average, geometric mean and median cadmium levels for the group of 60 women from the Island was (SE mean ), and μg of cadmium per gram of. Human dietary exposure to heavy metals via the consumption of greenshell mussels (Perna canaliculus Gmelin ) from the Bay of Islands, northern New Zealand; Opposing effects of dietary n-3 and n-6 fatty acids on mammary carcinogenesis: The Singapore Chinese Health Study.

Acute intoxication. The respiratory system is affected severely by the inhalation of cadmium-contaminated air: Shortness of breath, lung edema and destruction of mucous membranes as part of cadmium-induced pneumonitis are described [].As already reported inintake of cadmium-contaminated food causes acute gastrointestinal effects, such as vomiting and diarrhoea [].

Recent studies also suggest that cadmium exposure may produce other adverse health effects at lower exposure levels than previously predicted, including increased risk of hormonal cancers.

For example, researchers on Long Island estimated that as much as a third of breast cancer in the U.S. might be associated with elevated cadmium levels.

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